Currently, it takes some time to respond to comments because I have some other things I have to prioritize.

Friday, October 22, 2010

Multiculturalism

Left wings love words such as "multi culturalism" and "diversity." Japanese left-wings almost frantically use these words. They begin with either "In Europe", or "in Western countries."
Are western countries truly successful thanks to their multiculturalism and diversity?
The German chancellor, Angela Merkel's statement posed a question on this matter.



In this video, she says "multiculturalism had failed utterly." The most successful member of EU admitted the failure and she emphasized that "integration is necessary." Maybe it's time to rethink about this "myth of multi culturalism." Do European people live as harmoneously as they used to? Are they not lying to themselves?
By the way, I think Angela Merkel is a reliable politician because she can admit mistakes unlike so many other governors who can't tell truths in fear of losing supports from citizens. I believe politicians like her receive unshakable backing in the end.

Even in Sweden, which is regarded as one of the most successful example of multiculturalism, people voted against pro-immigration parties. The right-wing democratic party which clearly rejects immigrants gained 20 seats, and the government party led by Reinfeldt acknowledged the defeat.

This video represents the feelings of Swedish people who voted for the left wings.



This one describes problems in the Netherlands.


The latter two videos are more subjective than the first video, but at least they prove that there are two people who fear the current situation brought by multiculturalism.

Mr Cameron's words imply that Britain's land is too small for different groups to live separately.
http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/politics/cameron-my-war-on-multiculturalism-2205074.html

8 comments:

  1. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  2. I think there is both good and bad in multiculturalism (at least my view on what it is) I think immigrants bring a lot of good to a country, but some country's 1st and 2nd generation immigrants are harder to absorb than others- if not impossible.

    In the US we have a very diverse ethnic 'tree' with 6/10 coming from Europe, 1.5/10 come from South America, 1.5/10 come from Africa, and1/10 are Asian (Mostly Japanese, Chinese, and Koreans)

    The Western hemisphere (especially the US) was built on immigration, leading us to very wide ethnic diversities. For a lot of people it's a source of pride, but it has also causes a lot of historic friction. We have had a lot of "race riots" and many people are given a better chance in life simply because they are not 'white' (European heritage).


    The largest problem we have (same with Europe) are Arabic immigrants. Most Arabian cultures are very different from "Western" culture. They often come from a very narrow culture where there is essentially exclusive, making it very hard for them to become integrated with another way of thinking. Not to say all Arabian 1st generation immigrants are that way, many come for ideological acceptance or to belong to our country.

    I've learned in almost all cases. that after the 3rd generation immigrants are indistinguishable from their fellow countrymen. Even in most 2nd generation immigrants this is the case, and although most 1st generation immigrants want to be American (witch makes them so in my opinion) the way they behave makes them standout.

    I for example have a very mixed heritage of French, English, Scottish, Italian, German, Native, and Japanese - but i also remember that while i have those backgrounds my loyalty lies with America because it's my home.

    I think most people here feel the same way i do, while they have different backgrounds, their loyalty is to their birth country and homeland. This isn't always the case however, there are many communities who refuse to integrate with our culture and insists on following their own, mainly 1st generation immigrants.

    Crimewise also seems to be different, because legal 1st generation immigrants (opposite for illegal immigrants) commit slightly fewer crimes 3 times less often per 1,000 people than native born people.

    We are very unique when it comes to immigration though, we don't know what other style of life there is as 98.2% of our entire population are immigrants. We don't view national pride the same way as most other countries in the world when it comes to heritage.

    To me, if the person is willing to place America above their previous home in terms of loyalty should war erupt, abide by our laws, and learn our language, then i would gladly accept them as a follow countryman.

    However, If they move here and expect us to change our way of life to accommodate them, then i would not accept them as a fellow American, but as a foreigner. They would not have a desire to be American, but simply live here.

    This is the problem i see in Europe. European immigrants move to Europe, and expect Europe to change to meet their needs, when it should be the other way around. If i move to another country, i should try my best to adapt to their way of life, not tell them to change their way of life to better suit myself.

    Hehe..some of my European friends have called us "a bunch of mutts" because we don't have a ethnicity of our own. :P

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  3. Were you studying Sociology sometime in your life?
    You seem to be well-informed like grad student or teacher.
    Or is it just that I feel so because I am not informed enough?

    [In the US we have a very diverse ethnic 'tree' with 6/10 coming from Europe, 1.5/10 come from South America, 1.5/10 come from Africa, and1/10 are Asian (Mostly Japanese, Chinese, and Koreans)]
    Is it true that American people are being “sensitive” to Asians because Asian immigrants are rapidly increasing?

    [The largest problem we have (same with Europe) are Arabic immigrants. Most Arabian cultures are very different from "Western" culture. They often come from a very narrow culture where there is essentially exclusive, making it very hard for them to become integrated with another way of thinking.]
    I wonder if it applies to Asians.

    [while i have those backgrounds my loyalty lies with America because it's my home.]
    This feeling is necessary to maintain a country made of immigrants.

    [We don't view national pride the same way as most other countries in the world when it comes to heritage.]
    Some people think that short history and vast land are prerequisites to be a successful multicultural country. Do you agree with the opinion?

    [However, If they move here and expect us to change our way of life to accommodate them, then i would not accept them as a fellow American, but as a foreigner.]
    Do you think there are some people who gain nationality not to show the loyalty but to get greater power to accommodate other immigrants with the same background?

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  4. Sorry, every time I'm asking you questions.
    If it bothers, please just ignore. I don't want visitors to feel obliged to leave comment. I just want them to feel comfortable with my website.

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  5. {Is it true that American people are being “sensitive” to Asians because Asian immigrants are rapidly increasing?}

    Oh no, not today at least. It was true that back in the 1920s and late 1800s many people felt very threatened Asian immigrants (mostly Chinese) who came to the country in massive numbers (well thats China for you.. :P) that doubled a lot of town populations and caused radical political shifts on the West coast.

    Today the US has almost 7 million 1st generation Asian immigrants ( mostly Indian, Japanese, and Chinese) witch is a 2 million increase from 1990, a 4 million increase from 1980, and a 6 million increase from 1970. The rate of Asian immigration is acually much lower then the US-born population increase,while European immigration is around the same level.South America is the largest group of immigrants (several times larger if you count illegal immigration) of 10 million.


    Asians today are highly looked up to here, they make the most money on average, and are seen as very loyal to their family- both extremely prestigious traits. They are considered a role model for other minority American groups.

    I think a lot of it comes from how many people treated us under Bush (who admittedly was not popular..hehe positive perceptions of America fell from 70% to 38% :P). While most European countries despised us during that time, Asian countries general stuck by us during the bumpy road. I think that ment a lot to many people here, and made many people appreciate Asia much more, mostly Japan, South Korea, Singapore, Taiwan, India and the ASEAN countries.

    I also think China has a lot to do with it too. Ever since they threatened to nuke us, people have been very mistrusting of them, and even more so now after how they acted over the Senkaku Islands.

    I hope that answer your question..i did rant a bit :P

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  6. {I wonder if it applies to Asians.}

    Oh no, East Asian immigrants blend in perfectly here. Asian immigrants share almost all of America's basic values making it very easy for them to coexist and become integrated very quickly (especially if you include the stereotypes :P). Chinese immigrants are a exception (generally speaking, they are not all like this), they tend to form "Chinese communities" where they all live together "China town" and Chinese culture is overwhelmingly dominant.

    Whether it's done out of a play on American culture (trying to form economic opportunities with unique appeal) or they just refuse to integrate i do not know. It typically dies down after the 3rd generation, but almost all cities have their own "China town" inside of them. It's pretty cool, but i just do not know if they are trying to make business opportunities for themselves, or somthing else.

    The only cultures i can think of that have a hard time adapting to ours is Arabic, and East African. Europeans, East Asians, and South Americans (at least from i've observed) fit in very easily. It also depends where they settle too, Asians tend to find California and Hawaii appealing, while Europeans like the North-East coast, while South Americans like Texas. It may also be due to their travel routs, but if you place a European in Texas, they would probably find it much harder to be absorbed into the local culture than a Hispanic would.


    [Some people think that short history and vast land are prerequisites to be a successful multicultural country. Do you agree with the opinion?]

    I think it definitely helps a lot. A country that has had 3,000 years of culture, tradition , and a relatively small landmass could find a sudden influx of immigrants disastrous for it's way of life.

    A larger landmass allows people to spread out, and gradually mix different cultures together more peacefully, rather than confining 5 people who have completely different life styles in a house and say "live together". If several groups of people are placed close together, that do not share the same values- it will cause friction and infighting, but if they are spread out, they will have time to adapt to each other and have a greater understanding of themselves.

    Likewise if you have been doing somthing the same way for 1,000 years and all the sudden someone comes up and says "Do it this way instead" you will find it significantly harder to adapt to the new way. What may be right for some countries, may not right for others.

    I have never heard of that view before, but i can definitely see it having a lot of truth to it, i like it.

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  7. [Do you think there are some people who gain nationality not to show the loyalty but to get greater power to accommodate other immigrants with the same background? ]

    Hmm, i know of many examples where that did happen, but from what i've seen immigrants who typically gain citizenship are more appreciative of America than many US-born citizens (citizenship ceremonies are very emotional, i rarely see 1st generation immigrants who are not crying in joy)

    Acquiring citizenship is a very long process, involving a 25 year waiting period, history tests, tests on the constitution, and other US-specific things. It also requires an oath of loyalty, and extensive background checks. Most of the people who do not wish to give their allegiance to America are rooted out in the process (some always get through) by the large majority of them always seem to edgar and patriotic.

    I'm sure that most want to be citizens for noble reasons, but there will always be a few who only use the country to help their 'own people.'


    [Were you studying Sociology sometime in your life?
    You seem to be well-informed like grad student or teacher.]

    Oh thank you! But I'm only a normal 22 year old girl who has too much time on her hands :P
    hehe..i havent even attended college yet :P

    I think everyone knows a lot more about their homeland than others. You have taught me a lot about Japan for instance! :D

    [Sorry, every time I'm asking you questions.
    If it bothers, please just ignore. I don't want visitors to feel obliged to leave comment. I just want them to feel comfortable with my website. ]

    Oh please, it's perfectly fine! I love answering questions, and learning about Japan in the process. I always learn something new when i come here, and it's a lot of fun! :D

    For example, i had no idea we had so many similar thoughts on many things. I had always imagined Japan as being closer to Europe ideologically than us. I find it very hard to disagree with anything you say, as i agree with almost everything! :P

    Wow! I had to split it up into three parts, because it had a 4,000 character limit! :P

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  8. Thanks for the sincere answers. You must be a fast writer.

    ["Chinese communities"]
    I think the long history makes some of them too proud and prevents them from assimilation.

    [I have never heard of that view before, but i can definitely see it having a lot of truth to it, i like it. ]
    Really? Maybe you should write an essay on the theory.

    [Acquiring citizenship is a very long process, involving a 25 year waiting period...]
    The process seems to be much stricter than the naturalization process in Japan.

    [For example, i had no idea we had so many similar thoughts on many things.]
    Maybe I'm too Americanized...

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